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Frequently Asked Questions

overview
  • What is the background of Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF), also referred to as the Nelson Complex, was constructed in phases, beginning in 1947, to address the needs of the growing community. ​ The Nelson WWTF is located in the northeastern corner of the city of Mission with the city of Roeland Park to the east and Wyandotte County to the north. The Nelson WWTF serves two main tributary basins in northeast Johnson County – containing all or part of the cities of Fairway, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park and Shawnee. (view map of service area) ​ The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) require discharge limits for constituents such as ammonia, nitrogen and phosphorus. These constituents can be harmful to aquatic life and encourage the growth of nuisance algae in surface waters. The treatment technology currently in place at the Nelson WWTF is not capable of meeting these stricter future water quality standards. The collection system that the Nelson WWTF serves is also aging and can experience issues during large rainfall events. ​ In 2018, Johnson County Wastewater (JCW) commissioned a consulting engineering team to determine the optimum solution to these issues and develop a long-term capital improvement plan for the Nelson service area. The plan recommended a new Nelson WWTF to address the issues of the aging facility and regulatory obligations. The plan is also flexible to allow for the collection system issues to be mitigated over a 25-year period.
  • What are the drivers for the project?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is Johnson County Wastewater's (JCW) oldest treatment facility, dating back to the 1940s. A significant portion of the facility is at or near the end of its useful service life. The treatment technology currently in place is not capable of meeting future water quality standards. JCW looked at ways to control costs long-term and minimize future rate increases while meeting environmental standards and maintaining Johnson County’s quality of life. Replacement of the facility with newer technologies and provisions for adding expanded future wet weather treatment was determined to be the most cost-effective way to meet future regulations and provide a long-term treatment solution for our customers. ​ The four main drivers for the project are: Repair or replacement of aging infrastructure. The majority of assets are beyond their expected useful life and need to be replaced. New water quality regulations necessitate upgrades to the existing Nelson WWTF to improve water quality in Turkey Creek and downstream waters and meet permit requirements. Minimize nuisance issues (odors, noise, etc.). Set the facility up for future wet-weather flow as collection system improvements are made over a 25-year period.
  • What are the goals of this project?
    Provide the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers Improve water quality using the latest, proven technologies Preserve the high quality of life enjoyed by Johnson County residents
  • How will the project improve our quality of life?
    Protecting the environment and improving water quality in Turkey Creek and for downstream communities; Improving treatment operations by applying the latest, proven technologies; and Providing the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers.
  • What is the background of Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF), also referred to as the Nelson Complex, was constructed in phases, beginning in 1947, to address the needs of the growing community. ​ The Nelson WWTF is located in the northeastern corner of the city of Mission with the city of Roeland Park to the east and Wyandotte County to the north. The Nelson WWTF serves two main tributary basins in northeast Johnson County – containing all or part of the cities of Fairway, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park and Shawnee. (view map of service area) ​ The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) require discharge limits for constituents such as ammonia, nitrogen and phosphorus. These constituents can be harmful to aquatic life and encourage the growth of nuisance algae in surface waters. The treatment technology currently in place at the Nelson WWTF is not capable of meeting these stricter future water quality standards. The collection system that the Nelson WWTF serves is also aging and can experience issues during large rainfall events. ​ In 2018, Johnson County Wastewater (JCW) commissioned a consulting engineering team to determine the optimum solution to these issues and develop a long-term capital improvement plan for the Nelson service area. The plan recommended a new Nelson WWTF to address the issues of the aging facility and regulatory obligations. The plan is also flexible to allow for the collection system issues to be mitigated over a 25-year period.
  • What are the drivers for the project?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is Johnson County Wastewater's (JCW) oldest treatment facility, dating back to the 1940s. A significant portion of the facility is at or near the end of its useful service life. The treatment technology currently in place is not capable of meeting future water quality standards. JCW looked at ways to control costs long-term and minimize future rate increases while meeting environmental standards and maintaining Johnson County’s quality of life. Replacement of the facility with newer technologies and provisions for adding expanded future wet weather treatment was determined to be the most cost-effective way to meet future regulations and provide a long-term treatment solution for our customers. ​ The four main drivers for the project are: Repair or replacement of aging infrastructure. The majority of assets are beyond their expected useful life and need to be replaced. New water quality regulations necessitate upgrades to the existing Nelson WWTF to improve water quality in Turkey Creek and downstream waters and meet permit requirements. Minimize nuisance issues (odors, noise, etc.). Set the facility up for future wet-weather flow as collection system improvements are made over a 25-year period.
  • What are the goals of this project?
    Provide the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers Improve water quality using the latest, proven technologies Preserve the high quality of life enjoyed by Johnson County residents
  • How will the project improve our quality of life?
    Protecting the environment and improving water quality in Turkey Creek and for downstream communities; Improving treatment operations by applying the latest, proven technologies; and Providing the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers.
financial
  • What is the background of Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF), also referred to as the Nelson Complex, was constructed in phases, beginning in 1947, to address the needs of the growing community. ​ The Nelson WWTF is located in the northeastern corner of the city of Mission with the city of Roeland Park to the east and Wyandotte County to the north. The Nelson WWTF serves two main tributary basins in northeast Johnson County – containing all or part of the cities of Fairway, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park and Shawnee. (view map of service area) ​ The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) require discharge limits for constituents such as ammonia, nitrogen and phosphorus. These constituents can be harmful to aquatic life and encourage the growth of nuisance algae in surface waters. The treatment technology currently in place at the Nelson WWTF is not capable of meeting these stricter future water quality standards. The collection system that the Nelson WWTF serves is also aging and can experience issues during large rainfall events. ​ In 2018, Johnson County Wastewater (JCW) commissioned a consulting engineering team to determine the optimum solution to these issues and develop a long-term capital improvement plan for the Nelson service area. The plan recommended a new Nelson WWTF to address the issues of the aging facility and regulatory obligations. The plan is also flexible to allow for the collection system issues to be mitigated over a 25-year period.
  • What are the drivers for the project?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is Johnson County Wastewater's (JCW) oldest treatment facility, dating back to the 1940s. A significant portion of the facility is at or near the end of its useful service life. The treatment technology currently in place is not capable of meeting future water quality standards. JCW looked at ways to control costs long-term and minimize future rate increases while meeting environmental standards and maintaining Johnson County’s quality of life. Replacement of the facility with newer technologies and provisions for adding expanded future wet weather treatment was determined to be the most cost-effective way to meet future regulations and provide a long-term treatment solution for our customers. ​ The four main drivers for the project are: Repair or replacement of aging infrastructure. The majority of assets are beyond their expected useful life and need to be replaced. New water quality regulations necessitate upgrades to the existing Nelson WWTF to improve water quality in Turkey Creek and downstream waters and meet permit requirements. Minimize nuisance issues (odors, noise, etc.). Set the facility up for future wet-weather flow as collection system improvements are made over a 25-year period.
  • What are the goals of this project?
    Provide the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers Improve water quality using the latest, proven technologies Preserve the high quality of life enjoyed by Johnson County residents
  • How will the project improve our quality of life?
    Protecting the environment and improving water quality in Turkey Creek and for downstream communities; Improving treatment operations by applying the latest, proven technologies; and Providing the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers.
construction
technology
  • What is the background of Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF), also referred to as the Nelson Complex, was constructed in phases, beginning in 1947, to address the needs of the growing community. ​ The Nelson WWTF is located in the northeastern corner of the city of Mission with the city of Roeland Park to the east and Wyandotte County to the north. The Nelson WWTF serves two main tributary basins in northeast Johnson County – containing all or part of the cities of Fairway, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park and Shawnee. (view map of service area) ​ The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) require discharge limits for constituents such as ammonia, nitrogen and phosphorus. These constituents can be harmful to aquatic life and encourage the growth of nuisance algae in surface waters. The treatment technology currently in place at the Nelson WWTF is not capable of meeting these stricter future water quality standards. The collection system that the Nelson WWTF serves is also aging and can experience issues during large rainfall events. ​ In 2018, Johnson County Wastewater (JCW) commissioned a consulting engineering team to determine the optimum solution to these issues and develop a long-term capital improvement plan for the Nelson service area. The plan recommended a new Nelson WWTF to address the issues of the aging facility and regulatory obligations. The plan is also flexible to allow for the collection system issues to be mitigated over a 25-year period.
  • What are the drivers for the project?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is Johnson County Wastewater's (JCW) oldest treatment facility, dating back to the 1940s. A significant portion of the facility is at or near the end of its useful service life. The treatment technology currently in place is not capable of meeting future water quality standards. JCW looked at ways to control costs long-term and minimize future rate increases while meeting environmental standards and maintaining Johnson County’s quality of life. Replacement of the facility with newer technologies and provisions for adding expanded future wet weather treatment was determined to be the most cost-effective way to meet future regulations and provide a long-term treatment solution for our customers. ​ The four main drivers for the project are: Repair or replacement of aging infrastructure. The majority of assets are beyond their expected useful life and need to be replaced. New water quality regulations necessitate upgrades to the existing Nelson WWTF to improve water quality in Turkey Creek and downstream waters and meet permit requirements. Minimize nuisance issues (odors, noise, etc.). Set the facility up for future wet-weather flow as collection system improvements are made over a 25-year period.
  • What are the goals of this project?
    Provide the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers Improve water quality using the latest, proven technologies Preserve the high quality of life enjoyed by Johnson County residents
  • How will the project improve our quality of life?
    Protecting the environment and improving water quality in Turkey Creek and for downstream communities; Improving treatment operations by applying the latest, proven technologies; and Providing the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers.
environment
  • What is the background of Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF), also referred to as the Nelson Complex, was constructed in phases, beginning in 1947, to address the needs of the growing community. ​ The Nelson WWTF is located in the northeastern corner of the city of Mission with the city of Roeland Park to the east and Wyandotte County to the north. The Nelson WWTF serves two main tributary basins in northeast Johnson County – containing all or part of the cities of Fairway, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park and Shawnee. (view map of service area) ​ The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) require discharge limits for constituents such as ammonia, nitrogen and phosphorus. These constituents can be harmful to aquatic life and encourage the growth of nuisance algae in surface waters. The treatment technology currently in place at the Nelson WWTF is not capable of meeting these stricter future water quality standards. The collection system that the Nelson WWTF serves is also aging and can experience issues during large rainfall events. ​ In 2018, Johnson County Wastewater (JCW) commissioned a consulting engineering team to determine the optimum solution to these issues and develop a long-term capital improvement plan for the Nelson service area. The plan recommended a new Nelson WWTF to address the issues of the aging facility and regulatory obligations. The plan is also flexible to allow for the collection system issues to be mitigated over a 25-year period.
  • What are the drivers for the project?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is Johnson County Wastewater's (JCW) oldest treatment facility, dating back to the 1940s. A significant portion of the facility is at or near the end of its useful service life. The treatment technology currently in place is not capable of meeting future water quality standards. JCW looked at ways to control costs long-term and minimize future rate increases while meeting environmental standards and maintaining Johnson County’s quality of life. Replacement of the facility with newer technologies and provisions for adding expanded future wet weather treatment was determined to be the most cost-effective way to meet future regulations and provide a long-term treatment solution for our customers. ​ The four main drivers for the project are: Repair or replacement of aging infrastructure. The majority of assets are beyond their expected useful life and need to be replaced. New water quality regulations necessitate upgrades to the existing Nelson WWTF to improve water quality in Turkey Creek and downstream waters and meet permit requirements. Minimize nuisance issues (odors, noise, etc.). Set the facility up for future wet-weather flow as collection system improvements are made over a 25-year period.
  • What are the goals of this project?
    Provide the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers Improve water quality using the latest, proven technologies Preserve the high quality of life enjoyed by Johnson County residents
  • How will the project improve our quality of life?
    Protecting the environment and improving water quality in Turkey Creek and for downstream communities; Improving treatment operations by applying the latest, proven technologies; and Providing the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers.
flooding
  • What is the background of Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF), also referred to as the Nelson Complex, was constructed in phases, beginning in 1947, to address the needs of the growing community. ​ The Nelson WWTF is located in the northeastern corner of the city of Mission with the city of Roeland Park to the east and Wyandotte County to the north. The Nelson WWTF serves two main tributary basins in northeast Johnson County – containing all or part of the cities of Fairway, Merriam, Mission, Overland Park, Prairie Village, Roeland Park and Shawnee. (view map of service area) ​ The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) require discharge limits for constituents such as ammonia, nitrogen and phosphorus. These constituents can be harmful to aquatic life and encourage the growth of nuisance algae in surface waters. The treatment technology currently in place at the Nelson WWTF is not capable of meeting these stricter future water quality standards. The collection system that the Nelson WWTF serves is also aging and can experience issues during large rainfall events. ​ In 2018, Johnson County Wastewater (JCW) commissioned a consulting engineering team to determine the optimum solution to these issues and develop a long-term capital improvement plan for the Nelson service area. The plan recommended a new Nelson WWTF to address the issues of the aging facility and regulatory obligations. The plan is also flexible to allow for the collection system issues to be mitigated over a 25-year period.
  • What are the drivers for the project?
    The Nelson Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is Johnson County Wastewater's (JCW) oldest treatment facility, dating back to the 1940s. A significant portion of the facility is at or near the end of its useful service life. The treatment technology currently in place is not capable of meeting future water quality standards. JCW looked at ways to control costs long-term and minimize future rate increases while meeting environmental standards and maintaining Johnson County’s quality of life. Replacement of the facility with newer technologies and provisions for adding expanded future wet weather treatment was determined to be the most cost-effective way to meet future regulations and provide a long-term treatment solution for our customers. ​ The four main drivers for the project are: Repair or replacement of aging infrastructure. The majority of assets are beyond their expected useful life and need to be replaced. New water quality regulations necessitate upgrades to the existing Nelson WWTF to improve water quality in Turkey Creek and downstream waters and meet permit requirements. Minimize nuisance issues (odors, noise, etc.). Set the facility up for future wet-weather flow as collection system improvements are made over a 25-year period.
  • What are the goals of this project?
    Provide the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers Improve water quality using the latest, proven technologies Preserve the high quality of life enjoyed by Johnson County residents
  • How will the project improve our quality of life?
    Protecting the environment and improving water quality in Turkey Creek and for downstream communities; Improving treatment operations by applying the latest, proven technologies; and Providing the most cost-effective, long-term solutions for ratepayers.
schedule
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